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 CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Lun 12 Mai 2008 - 8:17

t'as une photot dans "at the point of no return" de M De TREZ p12 & 13.study
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screaming eagles

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Lun 12 Mai 2008 - 8:30

Tuche a écrit:
t'as une photot dans "at the point of no return" de M De TREZ p12 & 13.study
va vraiment falloir que je m'achète ces deux bouquins Very Happy

sinon tu pourrais pas la scanner please Wink Wink
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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Lun 12 Mai 2008 - 8:33

J'essaye ça ce soir.
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lad

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Lun 12 Mai 2008 - 15:22

Merci bien j attens aussi les photos,

lol!
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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Lun 12 Mai 2008 - 17:14

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Lun 12 Mai 2008 - 17:34

merci Tuche pour la photo

donc c'est bien ce que je pensais : ce sont des tenues de la 82°/504° PIR

allez lad, ou boulot lol! lol!
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lad

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Lun 12 Mai 2008 - 21:09

Une très bonne photo donc une bonne base merci à vous deux !


bier
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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Mar 13 Mai 2008 - 22:44

Salut,

Je pense que tes gants sont a l'envers. De plus, ce n'est pas les gants qu'utilisèrent les Paras le Jour-J. Ils portaient un modèle "cavalerie". Sinon, très belle figurine.
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lad

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Mar 13 Mai 2008 - 22:49

Les gants dont tu parles ne seraient ils pas ceux mis sur la figurine de DID David Meril, (toile beige claire, capitaine des rangers) car si c'est ce modèle je peux rapidement modifier ça.

Merci

lol!
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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Mer 14 Mai 2008 - 13:59

oui ils s'y ressemblent masi ils étaient en cuir a l'époque ...
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lafoy
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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Mer 14 Mai 2008 - 14:13

study
Image hébergée par servimg.com


Perhaps the most identifiable image among the American forces in Europe is the uniform and equipment of the Airborne soldier. The following is a piece by piece breakdown of the typical standard issue equipment and uniform given to American paratroopers during the Normandy Campaign. This is, however, by no means the only configuration of equipment issued, as many variations and improvised devices were used based on functionality and practicality. Total weight of all jump equipment exceeded 110 pounds.


M1C Paratrooper Helmet - The M1 steel helmet replaced the M1917A1 helmet in June of 1941. The shell is an OD#7 green color with a rough textured finish. Shade variations exist on original helmets from a light pea-green to almost black. WWII early war production shells can be identified by the location of the seam on the rim. The method of chin strap attachment is via a tack stitch to the loops of the shell. The steel shell was worn over the liner. There were multiple types and makes of liners, with many variations; too many to list here. The most common type was the compressed canvas resin impregnated liner with an HBT suspension. Earlier types were paper-fiber with rayon suspensions.

M1942 Paratrooper Jacket/Pants (Reinforced) - During early airborne operations in North Africa and Italy, the M1942 uniform was found to be lacking in several areas, most notably strength. The fabric is relatively thin and some seams should have had extra material added. The knees and elbows wore out easily, the pockets sometimes blew out due to the opening shock of parachutes and the single stitch in the crotch seam led to many tears in the "rear"
Sometime prior to Normandy, divisional riggers were directed to fix these problems. The riggers of the 82nd and 101st each came up with a similar though not quite identical fix. Heavy olive drab canvas was used to make elbow and knee patches, and reinforce the edges of the cargo pockets. Leg ties were added to the trousers to help compress the bulging hip pockets. Small variations exist in the way they are stitched between the 82nd and 101st, but they are essentially the same.

Jump Boots - Army jump boot design started by combining features from existing use by others, including German parachutists, units who started earlier than the U.S. and had already participated in combat in Europe, and U.S. Forest Service "smoke jumpers". The Marine Corps also had parachute units and experiments had shown the need for special footwear after broken bones were suffered.In August of 1942 the "Boots, Jumper, Parachute" was standardized, a tall laced boot with 11 to 13 pairs of lacing eyes depending on the foot size. It was a clean design that dropped straps and other reinforcements of earlier designs and had many points strengthened to take the punishing wear of jumping. The heel and sole were rubber with the heel leading edge slanted to avoid a snag point for lines.
The boots were very popular with the Airborne units, providing a strong, military look that was distinctively different from boots worn by other units. The Airborne troops tucked their trousers into their boot tops to show the maximum boot, more for appearance than for any other reason. The boots did as much for paratrooper morale as they did for their feet. These boots remained in service until the paratrooper uniforms and boots were merged with other Infantry uniforms in late 1944.

M1936 Suspenders - The M1936 field suspenders are OD# 3 (khaki) in color with a swiveling metal D-ring on each of the shoulders. Clips from the M1936 canvas field bag (or Musette bag) could be clipped to the D-rings and suspended on the back. GP bags could also be hung in the same manner. Later models of the M1936 suspenders included re-enforced shoulder straps (the D-rings dug into the user�s shoulders and collar bone).

M1936 Pistol Belt - This was a web belt issued to anyone who did not carry an M1 Garand or Springfield 1903 A3 rifle; including Machine Gun crews, those carrying the M1 Carbine or Sub Machine Gun and medics. It was usually worn with the pistol holster attached; and featured a female snap-button on the front left hand side for snapping the M1912, M1918, or M1923 magazine pouch or the Carbine magazine pocket onto it.
The belt was often worn in reverse, with the �US� appearing upside down in photos; this was done for a few reasons: one was to move the magazine pocket snap over to the right hand side. Another was that the eyelets would rip out after considerable use; so flipping the belt over allowed the user to utilize the other eyelets to hang gear from. Often gear was modified with loops to slide over the belt; rather than hang from it.

M1911 A1 .45 Caliber Pistol and M1916 holster - Known as "The Equalizer" or simply "The forty-five," this weapon was a recoil-operated, magazine-fed automatic developed in 1911 by John Moses Browning for Colt. The overall length of the pistol was 8.593 inches. Weight of the pistol with magazine was 2.437 pounds. The M1911 featured wooden "diamond" etched stocks, while the M1911A1 had all-plastic, brown checkered stocks. The M1911A1 was an improved version of M1911 released in the 20's. It is distinguishable by the clearance cut in the frame for the trigger finger and the raised and knurled mainspring housing on the rear lower of the grip. Both served in WWII.
The approximate weight of the loaded magazine with 7 rounds of the standard ball ammo was 0.481 pounds. An 11 round "trench" magazine also existed and was fielded in very small numbers. At 25 yards, the velocity of the round was 788 feet per second with a striking energy of 317 foot-pounds. At 25 yards, the round would penetrate 6 inches of white pine. It was quite a man stopper and vastly out powered the 9mm Luger Parabellum and Walther P-38 pistols in use by the Germans. Paratroopers of all ranks could and would carry a sidearm whenever possible. It was not relegated to officers only.

M1942 First Aid Pouch w/ Carlisle Bandage - This small web pouch carried the Carlisle bandage and had a single lift-the-dot snap. It is very similar to the M1924, being only slightly larger. The M1910 First Aid packet pouch was made up until 1942 and was a WWI carry-over; with 2 button closures on the flap. A British version of the pouch was also made; using British webbing and a horribly stiff snap-button.
Bandages were in a sardine can-like brass box or post 1941 a tin box was used. They were painted gloss orange/red if they contained the sulfanilamide powder but were not labeled as such; or OD green if the label was present. There was also a plastic variant made to save on tin use. Each box contained a single field dressing and a packet of sulfanilamide powder which was used to prevent infection. An additional Carlisle bandage was sometimes carried in a shirt or coat pocket; but other than that men were dependent on the combat medics for treatment should they be wounded. The dressing got its name from the place of its development: Medical Dept. Equipment Laboratory at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. Hence; the Carlisle bandage.

M3 Fighting Knife w/ M8 Scabbard - The M3 trench knife or fighting knife was a sturdy edged weapon issued to many troops in WWII including the airborne and the Army Rangers specifically. It was introduced in 1943 and made by nine different firms; some of the most common were Case, Camillus, Imperial, PAL, and Utica.The earlier M3 featured the M6 leather scabbard and it was quickly replaced and issued with the plastic M8. The M8 was further modified into the M8A1 with the addition of the standard M1910 metal belt hook

M1A1 Carbine w/ Folding Stock - Introduced into service in May of 1942, the M1A1 carbine was a modification of the M1 carbine. The primary modification was the use of a folding metal stock which reduced the length of the weapon by ten inches. Although the stock added a quarter of a pound to the weight of the carbine, the small size was vital for paratroopers and other soldiers who needed a more compact weapon. Approximately 150,000 M1A1 carbines were built during World War II by Inland Manufacturing Division (GMC). Maximum effective range was listed as 300 yards, but few men would trust the carbine beyond 100 yards, especially in cold climates where added layers of clothing worn by the enemy would further decrease the power of the weapon. Depending on which veteran you talk to; you'll find the Carbine to be either well loved or extremely disliked.

M19 Canteen w/ Cover - The canteen set consists of the carrier, the canteen, and the cup. Carriers can be OD#3 (khaki) or OD#7 (green) in color; the earlier models up to late 1944 being OD#3 (khaki). The bottle screw caps can be plastic (late war) or aluminum (early-pre war). The cups are either rolled edge (early) or flared edge (late) and are stainless steel. Canteens are carried on the cartridge or pistol belt using the M1910 wire hanger and corresponding eyelets, usually on the rear most set to the left or right of center. Flared rim cups do not transfer heat to the lips as does the rolled rim type.

Gas Detection Armband - In the Normandy invasion, Allied troops were equipped with chemical warfare equipment, as it was still unknown whether Hitler would employ poison gas on the battlefield. All Allied Invasion clothing was saturated with CC-2, an oily, smelly gas repellent, and special assault gas masks were issued in water resistant black rubberized bags. Arm brassards, made of a chemically impregnated light brown paper (resembling waxed paper), were to be worn on the shoulder. After sliding the armband up the sleeve, a small loop was threaded through the eppaulette to secure it in place. These brassards would turn red if exposed to mustard gas. Photographic evidence indicates the 502 PIR probably enforced the rule to wear these, whereas they were only spottily worn in the 501 and 506th. 101st Headquarters and glider units also seemed to wear them.

M1943 Musette Bag - Called simply the "Musette bag" this pouch clipped to the d-rings of the M1936 Suspenders and was worn on the back. It could also be carried as a shoulder bag (sometimes by medics) when used with a GP Strap. The late-war model with the tab w/ 2 eyelets for attaching an entrenching tool. The earlier models were entirely OD#3 khaki and dated between 1941 and 1944. These were most often used by paratroopers.

M1942 Entrenching Tool - Developed in 1943, this shovel was much improved and more robust. It can be used as a shovel or folded and locked to become a mattock or pick.

Paratrooper Gloves - An issued item of varied importance, the horse hide gloves had a rough exterior and a soft inside finish for comfort. The gloves provided not only protection from the elements but also were durable and tough enough to provide the hands with a layer of protection against heated gun barrels and cuts.

MKIIIA1 Fragmentation Grenade - The primary hand grenade of the 101st was the grenade, hand, Mk-IIIA1. About the size of a large lemon, the grenade was made of cast iron.The outside surface was deeply serrated, both horizontally and vertically, to assist in the dispersal of uniform-sized fragments on explosion. Later tests conducted post-war revealed that the outer serrations did little to aid in the fragmentation upon detonation. The filler of the grenade was EC blank fire powder or TNT. The weight of the grenade was 20 ounces, and its bursting radius was 30 yards, with a kill radius of 5 to 10.

Supplemental tie-on First Aid Kit - The supplemental first aid pouch provided an extra bandage with a tie on strap that could be attached either to the helmet, the ankle or the suspenders. The need for a fast and immediate dressing was apparent in the opening days of the Normandy campaign when conditions dictated that the regular bandage could not be reached.

M1 Carbine Ammo Pouch - The first model M1 Carbine magazine pouch held two 15 round magazines and slid over the pistol belt. It could be snapped to the button on its front. It was typical to see these also on the stock of M1 Carbines; as they could be slid over the weapon once disassembled from the muzzle end. Five magazines and two pouches were standard issue but more were frequently carried. When empty, magazines were not discarded.



bier
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lad

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Mer 14 Mai 2008 - 17:33

Merci pour les photos

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lad

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Jeu 15 Mai 2008 - 12:02

J'ai trouvé qlq photos plus ou moins bonnes d'un brassard pour les gaz et d'une paire de gants...






study
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fog

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Jeu 15 Mai 2008 - 13:51

Pour les gants, il y a quelques temps, j'en ai créer en les sculptants.

http://actionfigures.bbfr.net/ww2-allies-f40/101st-airborne-division-t29.htm#14991

Pas trop dur à faire.
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lad

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Jeu 15 Mai 2008 - 17:39

Sur les mains directement et ensuite peinture ?
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fog

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Jeu 15 Mai 2008 - 18:34

Oui exactement. Les mains étant la pour servir de squelette.
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lad

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MessageSujet: Re: CORBIN PASSE A LA 100 AB   Jeu 15 Mai 2008 - 22:49

merci pour l'info fog

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